GroundUp: South Africa’s 5-million working poor

Gilad Isaacs is the coordinator of the National Minimum Wage Research Initiative and an economist at Corporate Strategy and Industrial Development, School of Economics and Business Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand.

South Africa-Zimbabwe relations

The relations between South Africa and Zimbabwe are a key priority and concern for both nations. This is evidenced by the shared borders, close state relations, the significant Zimbabwean Diaspora within South Africa, and the crucial economic ties that buttress the weakened Zimbabwean economy. The Southern African Liaison Office (SALO) actively contributes to effective interventions focused on promoting peace and human security in Zimbabwe, including constructively influencing the South African government policy approach to Zimbabwe.

4 Sept | The Marikana Commission: Unearthing the truth, or burying it?

Mining and mineral beneficiation are held up as the path to economic development for South Africa. Yet these processes are often brutally disruptive for environments and communities. This semester the Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP) is exploring some of their devastating consequences for workers, communities and the nature that we all depend on for life itself.

4-6 Sept | Fort Hare Autumn School on Social Democracy and Political Economy

In April 2012, the University of Fort Hare and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung launched the “The Fort Hare Autumn School on Democracy and Political Economy”. This initiative is aimed at talented students from Eastern Cape Universities to enhance their critical thinking, promote leadership skills and knowledge about Social Democracy and Political Economy and above all to stimulate debate and political discussion among young, influential South African students.

10 Sept | Dissemination Seminar on the Decent Living Level

What constitutes a decent standard of living for people in South Africa? Despite the recognition of the destructive reality of poverty for many millions of people living in South Africa, there is still a lack of national consensus in South Africa on what is meant by the inverse of ‘poverty’, namely ‘sufficiency’. This has particular resonance in an upper middle- income country such as South Africa. The aim of this ongoing project is to derive an understanding of what constitutes a broadly acceptable living level that should be used to reflect a basic living level.

VIDEO: Holomisa warns protests may lead to a revolt

United Democratic Movement (UDM) leader Bantu Holomisa has warned the state to avoid dismissing the implications of the current service delivery protests sweeping across the country.

Holomisa was speaking at the Daily Dispatch and University of Fort Hare Dialogues in East London on Tuesday night. Some of his sentiments were echoed by fellow panellists, former Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) chairwoman Brigalia Bam, columnist Nompumelelo Runji, and columnist and Democracy Works chairman William Gumede.

Building Regional and International Consensus: Burundi, Lesotho, Madagascar and Zimbabwe

On 6 August 2015, the Southern African Liaison Office (SALO) in partnership with the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, hosted a consensus building dialogue on Burundi, Lesotho, Swaziland and Madagascar. This dialogue focused on these countries within the context of recent multi-lateral interventions in the respective countries.

Does South Africa need Electoral Reform?

The Daily Dispatch, Democracy Works Foundation, the University of Fort Hare and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung will be partnering on a public forum entitled ‘Does South Africa need Electoral Reform?’, taking place at the Guild Theatre in East London on 18 August 2015. Speakers include Brigalia Bam (Thabo Mbeki Foundation and former Chairperson, IEC), Bantu Holomisa (President of the UDM), Nompumelelo Runji (Sowetan columnist) and William Gumede (Democracy Works Foundation Director).

16 Sept | The Arcelor Mittal case: The power to pollute and the politics of knowledge

Mining and mineral beneficiation are held up as the path to economic development for South Africa. Yet these processes are often brutally disruptive for environments and communities. This semester the Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP) is exploring some of their devastating consequences for workers, communities and the nature that we all depend on for life itself.

18 Sept | The Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA): Developmental or destructive?

Mining and mineral beneficiation are held up as the path to economic development for South Africa. Yet these processes are often brutally disruptive for environments and communities. This semester the Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP) is exploring some of their devastating consequences for workers, communities and the nature that we all depend on for life itself.