All posts by Kulani Mashele

26-29 JUN|FORT HARE AUTUMN SCHOOL IN CHINTSA

From 26-29 June 2017, FES South Africa, in collaboration with the University of Fort Hare will host the second of three annual sessions of the Fort Hare Autumn School in Chintsa. The second Fort Hare Autumn School (FHAS) module will provide the necessary knowledge about key institutions and actors in South Africa’s political system to identify fault-lines, extrapolate checks and balances and comprehend the complexity of modern policy-making.

28 Jun|Legislating the National Minimum Wage

Venue: Wits Club Conference Centre, WITS West Campus – Empire Road, Yale Road entrance

The negotiations to introduce a national minimum wage are at an advanced stage at NEDLAC. Dr Shane Godfrey and Mario Jacobs, from the UCT Labour and Enterprise Policy Research Group (LEP), have followed the developments closely and are in the process of finalising a research paper that grapples with how the national minimum wage agreement can best be legislated. This considers questions of the national minimum wage’s relationship with existing laws, as well as the implications for sectoral determinations and bargaining council agreements. The structure of the legislation will have a strong impact on the success of the national minimum wage.

20 Jul |Symposium – High Time For a Common Integrated African Policy on China

The Africa-China Reporting Project is hosting a symposium on a Common Integrated African Policy On China with the Institute for Global Dialogue (IGD) associated with UNISA, and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) on July 20 at Wits University.  As the current co-chair of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), South Africa is uniquely positioned to … Continue reading 20 Jul |Symposium – High Time For a Common Integrated African Policy on China

13 Jun| POWER TO THE PEOPLE? MAKING DEMOCRACTIC PARTICIPATION PRACTICAL

Democracy, as a concept of the rule by the people, finds different expressions in systems of election and governance around the world. What is understood as democracy is thus subjective and often determined by socio-political and economic choices that have been made historically and often go unquestioned in societies over time.In recent years, South Africans of various backgrounds have been faced with frequent moments of personal and collective reflection about what constitutes its democracy, how democracy functions and, most importantly, what is the role of the citizen in maintaining a functional democracy in South Africa.

21-23 May|Transnational Worker Solidarity and Global Value Chains.

This project seeks to engage in auto sector specific research in a comparative transnational perspective by drawing on existing global value chain research. Furthermore, the project aims at initiating a transnational dialogue on new organizing approaches and on building (transnational) solidarity along the auto value chain.

2017| Digital Labour Markets in the Platform Economy Mapping the Political Challenges of Crowd Work and Gig Work

The so-called “sharing economy” is gaining momentum. As of 2016, Airbnb is valued at US$25.5 billion, while Uber is valued at US$62.5 billion. The two companies, which are presented as engaged in the “sharing of underutilised assets” – the commercial brokering of accommodation and of transportation, respectively – are now among the most valuable startups on the market.

2017| Increasing Inequality Reduces Long-term Growth German Economic Analysis Using a Macroeconomic Structural Model

Political and public debate in Germany has for some time seen growing discussion of the connection between increasing income inequality and economic growth. This discussion was instigated by a number of international empirical studies (OECD 2015; Ostry et al. 2014) that found indications of a negative link between more income divergence, on one hand, and development of the economy, on the other.

2016|COOPERATION OR CONFLICT? Occupational Trade Unions in the  German Industrial Relations System.

Since the early 2000s we have seen an unexpected – based on previous experience – increase in the influence of occupational and sectional trade unions, which were long scarcely known even to insiders. These organisations are prominent examples of a “new complexity“ in industrial relations, especially collective bargaining, in some parts of the private services sector – and possibly beyond it.